The Best Electricity Providers in the United States: A Comprehensive Guide.

 The Best Electricity Providers in the United States: A Comprehensive Guide.

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Section 1: A Brief History of Electricity

According to Wikipedia, “Direct current (DC) power was originally created by Thomas Edison in the 1880s.” However, Edison’s electrification project was cut short after an investor group challenged the government’s licensing process. As a result, there was a public backlash to the granting of licenses. In the 1930s, GE began a public education campaign designed to build public acceptance for electric power. This campaign emphasized the issue of freedom of choice. New York City soon began to use DC power for its streetlights.

All other electric power in the United States comes from alternating current. At the grid level, generators generate alternating current, which is then sent to large transformers.


Where Electricity Comes From?

As electricity distribution is decentralized, the electricity that most Americans consume is generated by utilities and transmitted to them via pipelines. Electricity is stored in consumers’ homes in the form of plug-in batteries.

History


Early on, electricity was generated in power plants using coal or natural gas. It was not until the late 1800s that the use of natural gas for power generation increased. During that time, electricity was also generated from coal power plants using coke, an artificial carbon-based fuel which generated more heat and pressure than natural gas. During the late 1800s, electricity generated from coal power plants was considered a dangerous source of energy.


The Benefits of Renewable Resources

Consumers do not need to own their own equipment and power sources to buy electricity. It is provided through a competitive electricity market. According to The Energy Information Administration, around 17% of the U.S. electricity supply comes from the burning of fossil fuels. Nearly 85% comes from "normal, or base, electricity generation" through a combination of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and hydroelectric power.

Today, there are more than 250,000 electric generating units (generators and plants) generating an estimated 115 terawatts of electricity (the energy equivalent of 1.5 million new Hoover Dams), accounting for more than 75 percent of the United States' total electrical capacity and about 30 percent of total U.S. energy consumption.


How to Choose a Provider?

A reliable electricity provider should serve the customers who use the most power during certain times of the day. In contrast, companies which supply less power are best for customers who use small amounts of power at any one time. But who exactly is your customer?

A review of the most recent energy use data by utility customers from the Department of Energy may offer clues. For instance, customers who draw their power from local sources usually live in rural or suburban areas. They are homeowners and apartment dwellers. They tend to use an average of 5,200 kWh per year. Customers who have their power provided by a large utility usually use about 20,000 kWh per year. This group includes utility customers, their households, and businesses in cities.


Guaranteed Rate Plan

The Best Electricity Providers in the United States: A Comprehensive Guide

There are a number of factors that can be considered when looking at the best electricity providers in the United States. What features are most important to you? Do you want to be able to select from a number of options? How about the ability to create custom plans?


The power that you use must be included in the cost of electricity. Utilities have a duty to make the distribution of electricity safe and reliable.

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Reliability


Electricity supply to customers is mostly governed by the local electric grid. In the United States, the majority of electricity is generated using conventional power plants.


Unreliable power sources include: wind, hydro, solar, tidal, biomass, geothermal, and nuclear power.


Flat Rate Plan

Many American homes have at least one flat rate plan which offers a fixed monthly cost regardless of usage. While this is helpful if you use little energy, it is expensive if you use more than expected. However, that doesn't mean you can't find a cheaper plan.

1. Discount plan


Many providers offer a discount plan which may actually be cheaper than a flat rate plan. If your usage is similar to what it usually is, a flat rate plan will be very expensive.


2. Renewable Energy


The power industry is getting up to speed with more solar energy being produced and more wind turbines being built. A recent study revealed that the U.S. could become a global renewable energy leader. In the U.S.

Pay-As-You-Go Plan

All Electric is a new pay-as-you-go electricity generation provider. They provide fast, easy and eco-friendly electricity to residential and commercial customers. All Electric is accessible with one monthly phone bill and no long-term contract required. They have more than 1,000 customers, but with a growth rate of 300% a year, they will soon surpass the 10,000 customer mark.


How All Electric Works.


When you visit All Electric’s website you are able to choose between several plans. These plans are referred to as “smart” plans because they will allow you to choose how much electricity you want. The “Residential 100% Smart Plan” is a $1,500 plan that you can use for 12 months.

Each month you will be charged a $19.99 subscription fee and your electric bill will be $0.12 per kilowatt hour (kWh).


Conclusion

If you do not live in the United States, then you may not be familiar with what makes an electricity provider important to your electricity usage and cost. There are many factors to consider, but here are the most important that I cover:

Continuous Power Production: How often does your electric company keep producing electricity? How often does it stop or "go off"? A utility's highest priority is to keep producing electricity as long as the electricity is needed and there is no greater urgency.


How often does your electric company keep producing electricity? How often does it stop or "go off"? A utility's highest priority is to keep producing electricity as long as the electricity is needed and there is no greater urgency.

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